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Vitamin D Where do you get yours from?

Some people say that vitamin D is not really a vitamin because we can make it when our skin is exposed to sunlight. However, in the UK, there are concerns that we do not make enough to keep our bones and muscles healthy. It is recommended that all of us get some vitamin D from our diet during autumn and winter, and some of us may need a dietary intake all year round.

If you are vegan, when choosing a supplement, be aware that some types of vitamin D are not vegan-friendly. Vitamin D2 is always suitable for vegans, but vitamin D3 can be derived from an animal source (such as sheep’s wool which is washed to remove the lanolin.

Lanolin (from Latin lāna ‘wool’, and oleum ‘oil’), also called wool yolk, wool wax, or wool grease, is a wax secreted by the sebaceous glands of wool-bearing animals. Lanolin used by humans comes from domestic sheep breeds that are raised specifically for their wool.

Vitamin D is an essential vitamin that boosts the immune system and plays vital roles in human metabolism. Did you know that tasty mushrooms are one source for vitamin D, and that you can naturally multiply their levels by exposing them to sunlight?

We evolved living in more sunlight than today. We make our own vitamin D when sunlight hits our skin cells. Many people living in the northern hemisphere, however, suffer from lower levels of vitamin D during the fall, winter and spring. Fortunately, you can make your own supply of vitamin D-enriched mushrooms by simply exposing them to sunlight. You can sun dry or UV-zap store-bought or homegrown shiitake, maitake, button, and many other mushroom species.

The best source is organic shiitake. The high vitamin D levels generated will last for more than a year. Surprisingly, even sliced and dried mushrooms—including wild ones picked the year before—will soar in vitamin D when placed outdoors under the sun or on a nice sunny windowsill for 6-8 hours.. Now, the summer time, from June until September, is the best seasonal window for people in northern latitudes to make vitamin D enriched mushrooms!

Note: Lanolin is included in many products such as Vaseline. As there is very little lanolin from the wool of a slaughtered sheep, then it is the wool from shorn sheep.

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