What if the World suddenly went Vegetarian

People become vegetarians for a variety of reasons. Some do it to alleviate animal suffering, others because they want to pursue a healthier lifestyle. Still others are fans of sustainability or wish to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

No matter how much their carnivorous friends might deny it, vegetarians have a point: cutting out meat delivers multiple benefits. And the more who make the switch, the more those perks would manifest on a global scale.

Let’s examine climate change.

Food production accounts for one-quarter to one-third of all anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions worldwide and the brunt of responsibility for those numbers falls to the livestock industry. Despite this, how our dietary choices affect climate change is often underestimated.

In the US, for example, an average family of four emits more greenhouse gases because of the meat they eat than from driving two cars – but it is cars, not steaks, that regularly come up in discussions about global warming.

Most people don’t think of the consequences of food on climate change but just eating a little less meat right now might make things a whole lot better for our children and grandchildren.

Computer models that predicted what would happen if everyone became vegetarian by 2050. The results indicate that – largely thanks to the elimination of red meat – food-related emissions would drop by about 60%. If the world went vegan instead, emissions declines would be around 70%.

When looking at what would be in line with avoiding dangerous levels of climate change, it was found that you could only stabilise the ratio of food-related emissions to all emissions if everyone adopted a plant-based diet, That scenario is not very realistic – but it highlights the importance that food-related emissions will play in the future.

Food, especially livestock, also takes up a lot of room – a source of both greenhouse gas emissions due to land conversion and of biodiversity loss. Of the world’s approximately five billion hectares (12 billion acres) of agricultural land, 68% is used for livestock.

Should we all go vegetarian, ideally we would dedicate at least 80% of that pastureland to the restoration of grasslands and forests, which would capture carbon and further alleviate climate change. Converting former pastures to native habitats would likely also be a boon to biodiversity, including for large herbivores such as buffalo that were pushed out for cattle, as well as for predators like wolves that are often killed in retaliation for attacking livestock.

The remaining 10 to 20% of former pastureland could be used for growing more crops to fill gaps in the food supply. Though a relatively small increase in agricultural land, this would more than make up for the loss of meat because one-third of the land currently used for crops is dedicated to producing food for livestock – not for humans.

The effect on health is mixed, too. Springmann’s computer model study showed that, should everyone go vegetarian by 2050, we would see a global mortality reduction of 6-10%, thanks to a lessening of coronary heart disease, diabetes, stroke and some cancers. Eliminating red meat accounts for half of that decline, while the remaining benefits are thanks to scaling back the number of calories people consume and increasing the amount of fruit and vegetables they eat. A worldwide vegan diet would further amplify these benefits: global vegetarianism would stave off about 7 million deaths per year, while total veganism would knock that estimate up to 8 million. Fewer people suffering from food-related chronic illnesses would also mean a reduction in medical bills, saving about 2-3% of global gross domestic product. 

All sounds great but it isn’t that easy, you can’t change the world overnight and unless we do something, take urgent action, we won’t have a world or food and water.

So, what can we do, how do we start to change the situation.
Moderation:
Meat-eating’s frequency and portion size is key.
The World Health Organization’s dietary recommendations would bring the UK’s greenhouse gas emissions down by 17% – a figure that would drop by an additional 40% should citizens further avoid animal products and processed snacks. “These are dietary changes that consumers would barely notice, like having a just-slightly-smaller piece of meat,” 

Certain changes to the food system also would encourage us all to make healthier and more environmentally-friendly dietary decisions, like putting a higher price tag on meat and making fresh fruits and vegetables cheaper and more widely available. Addressing inefficiency would also help: thanks to food loss, waste and overeating, fewer than 50% of the calories currently produced are actually used effectively.

“There is a way to have low productivity systems that are high in animal and environmental welfare – as well as profitable – because they’re producing meat as a treat rather than a daily staple,” Benton says. “In this situation, farmers get the exact same income. They’re just growing animals in a completely different way.”

In fact, clear solutions already exist for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the livestock industry. What is lacking is the will to implement those changes.

THE EXCUSES – ALL RESULTING FROM THE HUMAN RACES’ FEAR OF CHANGE.

IGNORANCE ISN’T AN EXCUSE ANY MORE

Please follow and like us:
error

Categorized: General, Vegetarian Info

Tags:

We Donate our Profits to Small and most Needy Rescues

Did you know that we give all the profits from our sales to UK animal charities. Not the BIG ones, but the little guys who open their homes to take in strays and those poor souls who have gotten lost or injured, taken in to try and find owners. They pay for treatments, neutering, defleaing and vaccinating. There are many and they go out at all times to rescue, day and night. I'm happy to post when donations are made.

Your Shopping Cart

Your cart is empty

The Lost book of Remedies

I wouldn’t be without this Book, it is my Herb and Vegetable Bible.

LikeBox

Facebook By Weblizar Powered By Weblizar

Goin All Veggies

Goin all Veggies
Goin all Veggies
A Must for all those considering changing their lives and becoming Vegetarian. Plus we give you TWO recipe books as a bonus
£7.00

Complete Handbook for Veggie and Vegan Diets

Complete Handbook for Vegetarian and Vegan Diets
Complete Handbook for Vegetarian and Vegan Diets
The Complete Handbook to Vegetarian and Vegan Living goes beyond a simple definition of vegetarianism by detailing the seven different types of vegetarian diets and detailing the foods omitted and allowed in each diet plan. . Plus we give you TWO recipe books as a bonus. Requires Adobe Reader and an Unzip programme or similar. These can be obtained free online
£7.00

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial